Friday, December 12, 2008


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Teaching Philosophy, Artist Statement and Resume

Teaching Philosophy by Stephen Robison

My aim is to direct students toward problem solving through creative research and critical discourse. Since there rarely is only one solution, I do not adhere to any single standard of style or content in my teaching; but strive to provide a wide base of information to encourage students to become free thinkers and find their own way of expressing ideas within the media. I urge ceramics majors to expose themselves to other disciplines inside and outside of art to help build on their visual and conceptual framework. Students are also encouraged to do their own research by visiting; artists' studios, museums, shows, the library, and attending workshops, conferences, and other organized field trips. I try and get at least one organized such event to happen each semester, for instance taking a group of students to a NCECA conference.

Teaching ceramics also requires structured assignments based around specific techniques (with formal, esthetic and conceptual outcomes), and technical projects or classes related to kiln building, glaze calculation and materials and effects. Technical projects and classes also need to address the safe use and handling of materials and equipment. I use frequent demonstrations, slide lectures, kiln building and glaze calculation projects, health and safety lectures on equipment and materials, reading assignments on philosophy and techniques, actual objects from my own collection and through museum and studio visits, and textbooks to instill part of that knowledge. I demonstrate techniques within hand building, mold making and throwing and relate the techniques to both contemporary and historical clay work. This opens up avenues to work with anatomical, architectural, natural form and utilitarian concepts. It also allows students the individual freedom to fully express themselves in both the sculptural and utilitarian aspects of ceramics on and off the wheel. Students are taught the technical skills and given the information necessary to form a foundation from which to make their own decisions about esthetics, concept and their preferable technique. In a recent article titled “Teaching After the End”, in the Fall 2005 issue of Art Journal, Daniel Joseph Martinez had been talking with David Levi Strauss about the continuing relevance of Joseph Beuys. He said that Beuys did not say, “ ‘ learn how to cut a piece of wood first.’ He said, ‘have an idea first.’ Once you’ve got an idea, the rest is simple.” I believe this to a degree and feel that with all the skill in the world you can become excellent at the crafting of an object, but without a strong concept you cannot craft an excellent piece. I also believe craft is not always a part of art. The idea of the piece, however, is not always the starting point. And a very important part of teaching which I beg to differ is not “simple” are the techniques that need to be learned. Through the execution of certain skills or techniques, one can develop an idea or concept. I believe that teaching someone how work with the clay on and off the wheel can be a springboard for a student to develop ideas. When they learn how to manipulate a material, they can then understand what can be done with that material. Within this philosophy a work ethic can also be instilled and a student can learn that nothing is more beneficial than the actual act of working with clay.

When students are exposed to what has been done with clay from contemporary artists such as Marilyn Levine’s work and other trompe l’oeil artists to the work of historical pots and sculpture and what is being done presently with installation, utilitarian, figurative and architectonic work, they are then exposed to the full scope of ceramics. They then have the capacity to develop ideas in any direction because they realize there is an unlimited potential with the media from scale to surface to color to concept. That is the initial direction I coax my students towards to find ideas, I do stress the most important question the student needs to ask when making their work is why they are creating it.

Regular sessions encouraging critical dialog about art, craft, philosophy, history, and current issues help students to create their own conceptual basis. Students must learn how to write an artist statement, resume, and learn how to document their work. Advanced students give presentations on contemporary artists that help them to express aesthetic ideas in both the spoken and written world. In this research they are exposed to several media such as Keynote or PowerPoint and most recently Podcasting their work. Advanced students are also expected to have goals set for entering shows and getting exposure to their work outside of academia. In this pursuit the advance student learns documentation, presentation and how to create a digital portfolio and areas on the web where they can archive that portfolio.

I also address professional options. Students are challenged with discussions about what they want to do with their degree; these topics start to enter my lectures around the beginning of the students’ third year. I help them determine what they need to prepare for graduate school application and other options such as residencies, workshops and apprenticeships to further the evolution of their work. When working with MFA students’ goals, I also direct them toward artist residency programs and apprenticeships but also help them put together a clean well-read job application. This kind of mentoring along with my dedication to each student’s development as artists, demonstrates my genuine concern for the future of each individual. I do not, however, have any sort of idealist notion that each individual student is driven enough to make it as a practitioner of the arts within the realm of education or the professional world of art.

I believe that my goal as an educator is to be a conduit of information for students to tap. With that said it is my responsibility to not only keep up on my own research as it pertains to my investigation into ceramics but also possible avenues that may help me direct students down their own road. My research and production of my own work and a constant show record; along with setting an example with a strong work ethic are also definitely major teaching tools. Students need to know that they need to be seriously dedicated and set goals for their careers as artists if they are to be successful.


Artist Statement
Stephen Robison

In my work I focus on vessel formats as platforms for utilitarian, conceptual and spatial investigations. I continue to have a focus on the strictly utilitarian. However, over the last few years one concept that has dominated my work incorporates forms and surfaces related to diatoms and viruses. This work is still meant to function as containers, pouring vessels or drinking vessels, but some of that function may be sacrificed for form and concept. Tactile considerations are still of importance in the utilitarian based work. However, form, surface and concept are my primary focus in this work. The forms and surfaces of some viruses and diatoms have been a great source for abstraction. What viruses can do for or do to our world is fascinating and frightening to me. Genetic virology is not always going to be understood by the viewer, but I don’t find that to be crucial for the work to be appreciated.

My direction in both sculpture and utilitarian ceramics both feed one another. Historical and contemporary use of visual language and utilitarian objects are two main sources for my research. Working within the context of sculpture along with the utility of ceramics allows me to communicate more than purely the use of the object and working outside of purely sculptural considerations I have the addition of utility and an intimate contact between the audience and the piece.

Objects of use and domesticity have a common language, which a large and diverse audience can appreciate and relate to. This may be the initial draw to my work but appreciation of the concepts and esthetics may seep into the viewer after further investigation. The sense of humanity that a well thought out handmade object can obtain is not found in objects that can be purchased at Wall Mart or produced by the machines of industry. Thoughts about the user of objects are often negated for practical reasons such as economic, shipping or durability, and this results in objects that have no life or value of their own but fit very well into our disposable society. Furthermore, the content that use to be in objects of utility has turned to nothing more then trite or kitch reflections of hallmark holiday tributes. I have a firm belief in the connection of the mind to the hand and the hand to the media. Like the lips to a read, technology can not replace or even come close to the sensitivity that the artists has with his or her material. A major intent of mine is to create tactile qualities in these objects that offer an intimate relationship with the user and provide the objects with an inherent value that gives them a life of their own. I cannot do this without my touch playing a part in the creation of the object. Generating a pleasurable and possibly a reflective experience when being used and viewed creates new challenges with each object made. Visual balance by using proportional perspectives, physical balance within the weight and pivot points of the piece along with tactile qualities are issues I address to achieve these goals.

Ultimately, I want my utilitarian objects to be used. This objective is for both my virus pieces and my strictly utilitarian work. With work that is firmly based in utility I still want an esthetic to prevail and at times I want conceptual concerns to also be inherent. It is almost more difficult to work within those restraints of a utilitarian piece because they are just that, restraints. Calligraphic work and textiles influence much of my utilitarian work. Using brushwork with slips and terra sigillata and the use of repetitive marks like a stitching pattern are reflective in much of my strictly utilitarian work.

Purely sculptural work for me still has parameters, so there are sort of rules when I work in that direction. I set those rules based not on an already prescribed vocabulary in the vernacular of the ceramic vessel, such as handle spout, foot, body, belly or neck. However parameters are still set by some prescribe formats that I have mentioned. For instance when I work with the landscape format I set a primarily horizontal restriction. In some virus landscapes I have not gone to far out of the horizontal mode. In some that are still in the drawing stage I have worked out more vertical focal points. In an installation I am planning, one of the parameters will be the space it will be contained in. I like the word parameters rather then restrictions, it sounds more like a guideline not a set of exacting rules. In my work I do allow quite a bit of intuition and evolution to occur in the making of the piece, the firing of the piece and or reductive work or additive work after the first firing. Such as sandblasting or the addition of wax or other materials.

As I am explaining the work and the process I refer to it as my work. I do feel it to be my work but it is also not ever solely attributed to me.

The collaborative process is of a constant in my work. I see our role as artists to be a conglomeration of appropriations and that we never reinvent the wheel we only keep it rolling along. To me one thing always leads to another and in that understanding of growth, (in any discipline), growing with a partner or with a team effort has been part of my thought process for some time. From the time when I was working on my BFA and one of my main mentors Charlie Olson and I worked together on some pieces I was hooked on working with people rather than being a solo artist.

My main collaborator is my partner for almost two decades, Kathy Guss.  Kathy and I have been on and off again working directly on pieces on paper and in clay. The off times are still rooted in the collaborative spirit, as the thought process and the conceptual concerns are still in part collaborative. And although I show work at times with my solo name it is also in part Kathy's work too. In the last few years we have started working together again hand in hand and not just in name. This has revitalized the work and help the direction to move forward, as Kathy has physically re entered the studio, productivity has risen to allow the growth forward at a more rapid rate. Solid teamwork is always more beneficial to productivity.  People often ask what part do you do and what part does Kathy do? This is not really very easy to answer because there are times when I do this and she may do "this" next time.  Some work like brush work and glazing has almost always been in my hands, and maybe I do more of the throwing. But we are both at a level of understanding and control with clay on and off the wheel and we don't worry about how to accomplish it, why we are doing it is the main focus.

Some work in the part few years has somewhat stemmed out of the collaborative work but is really solely my work and those pieces are rooted in both the figurative traditions and also in less traditional site specific pieces.

Technical Considerations

Presently I am working with porcelain and stoneware clay bodies. I am using a variety of techniques using slips, under glazes, terra sigillata, glazes and atmospheric effects to achieve my surfaces. I am primarily working with high fire temperatures and using some low temp techniques on top of the high fire surfaces and sometimes using sandblasting to achieve a surface. I have also returned to soda firing and wood firing, having just finished building a new wood kiln and finishing up a new soda kiln. The kiln quite often is the means to the end and using certain types of firing such as soda, salt and wood firing adds subtleties to the surface of the forms. I also have a slight problem with addiction to process and wood firing does have a slight hold on me, but I use the glaze and firing technique that best works with what I want the final outcome of the piece to be.

Building techniques are on and off the wheel. I use throwing, altering forms, slump molding, molds and other additive and subtractive techniques.




STEPHEN ROBISON
318 S Mt. Daniels Dr
Ellensburg, WA 98926
509 607 9726
robisons@cwu.edu

Education

MFA:  1994; University of Iowa, Iowa City           
MA:     1992; University of Iowa, Iowa City                                                                                                    
BFA:   1990; University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

Exhibitions


2012

March “Cups and Coffee”, (juried), International Juried Cup Show, Fuel Coffee, Seattle, WA

March “The Beer Stein”, Elysian Capital Hill, Brew Pub, Seattle, WA

March “Northwest Wood Fire Kilns”, Pots Gallery, Seattle, WA

March “100 Wood-Fired Cups”, Curated by Charles Hindes, Pots Gallery, Seattle, WA

March “West Coast Wood-Fire”, Curated , The Fire Arts Center in Arcata, Ca

January- March “From The Ground Up”, Larson Gallery, Yakima, WA

Feb. “Benefit Art Auction”, (juried), Artist Trust, Seattle, WA


2011

Oct. “Travel Size: A Ceramic Visit With artaxis.org”, (juried), Southwestern College Art Gallery, Chula Vista, CA

May  “12th Annual Clay Invitational -19 Artists”, Curated by Steve Gibbs, The Art Spirit Gallery, Coeur d'Alene, ID

2010

Dec. “The Simple Cup”, Curated by Peter Olsen, Kobo at Higo, Seattle, Washington

Nov. “Un-wedged”, (juried), Pottery Northwest, Seattle, Washington

June “American Mug”, Curated by Scott Lykens, LTC Gallery, University of Arkansas Monticello, Monticello, Arkansas

June14th annual Bray Benefit Auction and Brickyard Bash”, Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana

Mar. “2010 Yunomi Invitational”, Akar Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa
                 
Feb-Mar. “40th Annual Ceramics Invitational”, Crossman Gallery, University of Wisconsin, Whitewater


2009

Dec. “Winter Show”, Greensboro Cultural Center, Greensboro, North Carolina

Nov.-Dec. “North American Clay”, David Smith and Company, Curated by Peter Olson, Seattle, Washington

Sep.-Nov. Stephen Robison, Solo Show, LTC Gallery, Curated by Scott Lykens, University of Arkansas Monticello, Monticello, Arkansas


Show Record before joining CWU faculty. 

2009

Jan. “20 Below 22 Above, Ceramics Invitational”, Curated by  Wil Shynkaruk, Minnesota State University, Moorhead, Minnesota






2008

Cape Fear Studios Invitational, Fayetteville, NC

“Legacy of Bunny McBride”, Akar Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa

 “10 Cups”, Lill Street Gallery, Chicago Illinois

“Yunomi”, Akar Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa

“Form and Transformation in Clay”, Fayetteville State University, Rosenthal Gallery, Fayetteville, North Carolina

“UNCP Faculty Show”, Sandhills Community College, Southern Pines, North Carolina

2007

“Winter Show”, Greensboro Cultural Center, Greensboro, North Carolina

“By the Ounce”, (juried), Louisville, Kentucky

“Contemporary Ceramics Invitational”, The Dairy Barn; Southeastern Ohio Cultural Arts Center, Athens, Ohio
(Scheduled, March and April)

“The New Aesthetics of Ceramics”, (juried), Huntington University, Huntington, Indiana

“Containment”, LTC Gallery, University of Arkansas Monticello, Monticello, Arkansas

“Yunomi”, Akar Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa


2006

“Solo Show and Tea Ritual”, NNU Gallery, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China

“Faculty Exhibition”, A.D. Gallery, Pembroke, North Carolina

“New Hampshire Institute of Art, Ceramic Biennial”, (juried), New Hampshire Institute of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire

“20 + 1 Woodfire Conference Invitational”, NAU Museum of Art, Flagstaff, Arizona

“Watershed Auction”, New Castle, Maine

“Natural Wonders”, Lacoste Gallery, Concord, Massachusetts

“Crafts National”, (juried), Lancaster Museum of Art, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

“The Jeanne and Bill Porter Collection of Ceramic Art”, Holter Museum of Art, Helena, Montana

“The Art of The Teapot”, (juried), Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, Michigan

“The Teapot”, LTC Gallery, University of Arkansas Monticello, Monticello, Arkansas


2005

“Craft Forms”, (juried), Wayne Art Center, Wayne, Pennsylvania

“Cup: The Intimate Object IV”, (juried), Charlie Cummings Clay Studio, Fort Wayne, Indiana

“Holiday Festival”, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

“Resident Scholarship Silent Auction”, The Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana

“Wood Fire Raffle”, Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle, Maine

“Julius Schmidt and his Radillac Group”, Chait Gallery, Iowa City Iowa

“Cup in The Hand”, (juried), Architecture Resource Center”, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan

“Ceramics 2005”, (juried), Guilford Handcraft Center, Guilford, Connecticut

“Gas it Up: Salt, Soda and Slip”, (juried), Baltimore Clayworks, Baltimore, Maryland



2004

“Cup: The Intimate Object III”, ((juried), Charlie Cummings Clay Studio, Fort Wayne, Indiana

“Fine Contemporary Crafts”, (juried), Artspace, Raleigh, North Carolina

“Funk-Tion National”, (juried), Stretch Gallery, Pineville, North Carolina

“30 x 5”, Akar, Iowa City, Iowa

“Third Annual Soda / Salt National”, (juried), The Clay Studio of Missoula, Missoula, Montana

“Forms and Shapes: The Box”, Akar Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa

“2004 International Juried Woodfire Exhibition”, (juried), Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

“4th Annual National Juried Cup Show”, (juried), Gallery 138, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
                 
                  “Synergism”, (juried), Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

2003

“100 Teapots”, (juried), Baltimore Clay Works, Baltimore, Maryland

“Cup: The intimate Object II”, (juried), Charlie Cummings Gallery, Fort Wayne, Indiana

“MSU Faculty Collects; MSU Faculty and Their Inspirations”, Montana State University, Helen E. Copeland Gallery,
Bozeman, Montana

“Cup Exhibition”, Shelburn Craft Center, Shelburn, Vermont

“Kathleen Guss and Stephen Robison”, Artworks Gallery, Bozeman, Montana

“Just Bowls”, Artworks Gallery, Bozeman, Montana

“Karl Borgeson and Friends”, Crossman Gallery; University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

2002

“From the Kitchen to the Table”, (juried), Artworks Gallery, Bozeman, Montana

“Art for Living”, Artisans Center of Virginia, Waynesboro, Virginia

“Guss and Robison: New Work”, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas

“Utilitarian Ceramic National”, (juried), traveling show
                                    Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, Louisiana
                                    Southeastern University, Hammond, Louisiana
                                    Louisiana College, Pineville, Louisiana

“Prevailing Winds”, (juried), Young and Constantine Gallery, Wilmington, Vermont

“Hand Crafted”, (juried), Rocky Mount Arts Center, Rocky Mount, North Carolina

“Materials: Hard and Soft”, (juried), Center for the Visual Arts, Denton, Texas

2001
“Sul Ross State University Ceramic Invitational”, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas

“A View of Contemporary Ceramics”, (juried), Chester Springs Studio, Chester Springs, Pennsylvania

                  “Mug Shots 2001”, Artworks Gallery, Bozeman, Montana

“Guss, Roberts and Robison”, Baylor University Art Gallery, Waco, Texas

“Feats of Clay”, (juried), Lincoln Arts, Lincoln, California

“National Juried Cup Show”, Gallery 138, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

“Ceramics 2001”, (juried), The Guilford Handcraft Center, Guilford, Connecticut

“Archie Bray Foundation, Scholarship Benefit Show”, Helena, Montana

“The Functional Teapot”, Ryan and Maclean, Helena, Montana

2000

“Peripheral Focus”, Bradford Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia

“Art for Life”, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri

“Invitational Alumni Exhibition”, Crossman Gallery, University of Wisconsin

“Faculty Exhibition”, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri

“Ceramics for Food”, (juried), Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, Louisiana

1999

“Inaugural Exhibition”, The Renaissance Center; Dickson, Tennessee

“Ritual of the Table”, (juried), Odyssey Gallery; Asheville, North Carolina

“Earthly Treasures”, (juried), Pewabic Pottery; Detroit, Michigan

 “Candlesticks”, (juried), Native Soil Gallery, Chicago, Illinois

Alumni Ceramic Exhibition, University of Iowa, Alumni Center Gallery, Iowa City, Iowa

"Baskets", (juried), Native Soil, American Pottery Traditions, Evanston, Illinois

“Archie Bray Foundation Benefit Auction", Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana

"The Mark of The Maker", Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

Faculty Exhibition, Leu Art Gallery, Belmont University, Nashville, Tennessee

“The Kennedy Douglass Center for the Arts National Ceramic Competition”, (juried), Florence, Alabama

"Lets Dance", (juried), Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan

1998

"Artforms", (juried), Tennessee Arts Commission Gallery, Nashville, Tennessee

"Crossroads in Clay", (juried), Middletown Fine Arts Center; Middletown, Ohio

"Best of Tennessee Crafts", (juried), traveling show
The Parthenon Gallery; Nashville, Tennessee,
The Carroll Reece Museum, ETSU, Johnson City, Tennessee,
The Clarksville Museum; Clarksville, Tennessee,
The McMinn Living Heritage Museum; Athens, Tennessee,
The University Museum; UT-Martin, Martin, Tennessee,
The Creative Arts Guild; Dalton, Georgia

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              "The Chef John Folse Utilitarian Ceramics Competition", (juried), Ameen Art Gallery; Nicholls State University; Thibodaux, Louisiana

"Belmont University Faculty Art Exhibition", Leu Art Gallery; Nashville, Tennessee

“Resident Artist Exhibition”, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

"28th Annual Ceramics Invitational Exhibition, Featuring Wood Fired Ceramics", Crossman Art Gallery; University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

"Dinner Works", (juried), Louisville Visual Art Association; Water Tower Gallery; Louisville, Kentucky


1997

"Wood fired Invitational", University of Missouri; Columbia, Missouri

"The Box", (juried), Bonna-Keanne Gallery; Portland, Oregon

"Anything That Pours", Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

"The Clay Cup", (juried), Southern Illinois University; Carbondale, Illinois

“Resident Artist Exhibition”, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

“All Fired Up”, (juried), Boise State University; Boise, Idaho

“The 87th Annual Water Tower Show”, (juried), Louisville, Kentucky

1996

“The Festive Table”, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

“Holiday Exhibition”, Pewabic Pottery; Detroit, Michigan

“4th Annual Strictly Functional Pottery National”, (juried), Market House Craft Center; Ephrata, Pennsylvania

1995

“Holiday Exhibition”, Pewabic Pottery; Detroit, Michigan

“Steeped in Clay”, (juried), Art Space; Lima, Ohio

“Teapot Invitational”, Cone Ten Gallery; New Orleans, Louisiana

“Summer Exhibition”, Kavish Gallery; Ketchum, Idaho

“Resident Artist Exhibition”, Archie Bray Foundation; Helena, Montana

“Woodstack Exhibition”, University of Montana; Missoula, Montana

“Bray Clay”, MJL Impressions; Minneapolis, Minnesota

“Minnesota Hot Dish”, (juried), Northern Clay Center; St. Paul, Minnesota

"Eight in Clay", Bebe Kazar Gallery; Whitefish, Montana

1994

“ABF Resident Show”, Myrna Loy Center; Helena, Montana

“2nd Annual Strictly Functional Pottery National”, (juried), Market House Craft Center; Ephrata, Pennsylvania

“Functional Ceramics- 25th Invitational Exhibit”, Crossman Gallery; University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

1993

“MFA Thesis Exhibition”, University of Iowa Museum of Art; Iowa City, Iowa

                   “Four Off the Wall”, Clapp Gallery; University of Iowa, Iowa City

“Haystack Assistants Show”, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; Deer Isle, Maine

“Eclectic Nature”, Eve Drewelowe Gallery; University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

1992

“Muscatine Art Center Biennial”, (juried), Muscatine, Iowa

“Silver: New Forms and Expressions III “,(juried), traveling show
Union Art Gallery; Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Newport Art Museum; Newport, Rhode Island,
Walter Anderson Museum of Art; Ocean Springs, Maryland,
National Ornamental Museum; Memphis, Tennessee,
Fortunoff; New York, New York
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Newport Art Museum; Newport, Rhode Island
“Teapots and Tequila Cups”, Eve Drewlowe Gallery; University of Iowa, Iowa City

“The Influence of Chunghi Choo”, Waterloo Museum of Art; Waterloo, Iowa

1988

"Metals Exhibition”, (juried), Southern Illinois University; Carbondale, Illinois




1987

Midwest Metals Exhibition”, (juried), University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

“Metaphors”, (juried), Cudahy Gallery; Milwaukee Museum of Art; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

 
Gallery Representation
 
Nicklas Gallery, Seattle, Washington
 
Akar, Iowa City, Iowa
 
Appalachian Center for Crafts Gallery, Smithville, Tennessee

Lill Street Gallery, Chicago, Illinois
 
Public Collections

Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing China

The Sparta Teapot Museum, Sparta, North Carolina

The Sawtooth Art Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Baylor University, Museum of Art, Waco Texas

University of Iowa, Museum of Art, Iowa City, Iowa

University of Wisconsin, Crossman Gallery, Whitewater, Wisconsin

Selected Private Collections

Sonny and Gloria Kamm, Los Angeles, California

Daniel Jacobs, Richmond Virginia

Janet Mansfield, Sydney, Australia

Emmy Lou Harris, Nashville, Tennessee

                  Koko Taylor, Chicago, Illinois

Robert Taunt, Helena, Montana

Janet Koplos, New York, New York

Gary Portnoy, New York, New York

 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 
 
 


 





 
Awards and Grants

2011

G.A.P Grant, (Grants for Artist Projects), Artist Trust

CAH Summer Research Grant

2010

Nov. Honorable Mention,Un-wedged”, Juried Exhibition, Pottery Northwest, Seattle, Washington
 
Awards and Grants before joining CWU faculty

2008

Travel Grant, Teaching and Learning Center, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

2007

Research Grant, Provosts Office, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

2006

Digital Academy Grant, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

Travel Grant, Teaching and Learning Center, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

2005

Teaching and Learning Center Grant, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

2004

Foundation Grant, NCMC, Petoskey, Michigan

2003

Excellence in Teaching Award, NCMC, Petoskey, Michigan

2002
                                                           
First Place, Art for Living, Artisan’s Center of Virginia, Waynesboro, Virginia

2001

Purchase Award, “Feats of Clay”, Lincoln Arts, Lincoln, California

“National Juried Cup Show”, Gallery 138, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

Third Place, “Ceramics 2001”, The Guilford Handcraft Center, Guilford, Connecticut

1998

Second Place, "The Chef John Folse Utilitarian Ceramics Competition", Ameen Art Gallery; Nicholls State University; Thibodaux, Louisiana

1987

Purchase Award, “Metaphors”, Cudahy Gallery; Milwaukee Museum of Art; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Merit Award, Midwest Metals Exhibition”, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Teaching Experience

2009- Present: Assistant Professor in Ceramics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington

2004-2009: Assistant Professor in Ceramics, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Spring of 2008: Visiting Professor in Beijing, Xian, Jingdezhen, and Nanjing

2006 Oct.-Nov: Visiting Professor, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China

2006: Visiting Professor, Nanjing Art Institute, Nanjing, China

2002-2004: Assistant Professor in Ceramics, Sculpture, Metalsmithing and Drawing, North Central Michigan College, Petoskey, Michigan

2000-2002:  Visiting Assistant Professor in Ceramics; Department of Crafts, School of Art, Virginia Commonwealth University; Richmond, Virginia

1999-2000:  Visiting Assistant Professor in Ceramics and 3-D Design; School of Art, The University of Missouri; Columbia, Missouri

1997-1999:  Instructor in Ceramics; School of Art, Belmont University; Nashville, Tennessee

1996 - 1999:  Instructor in Ceramics; Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1994-1996:  Instructor in Ceramics; Archie Bray Foundation; Helena, Montana

1994-1995:  Instructor in Painting and Drawing; Helena Fine Arts Center; Helena, Montana

1992-1994:  Adjunct Instructor in Ceramics; University of Iowa, Iowa City

1990:  Adjunct Instructor; Metals; University of Iowa, Iowa City
 
                  Professional Experience and Service

March 2010- Ongoing, Moderator for the Education Forum at CeramicDaily.org http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?/forum/25-education/page__s__c4c6fa418dfde7088a48b415eaf44fcb

April 2010-March 2011 Member of NCECA Host Committee, Seattle, Washington

July 2010: Visiting Artist for Wood Firing, LH Project, Joseph, Oregon

Mar. 2010: 44th National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts, Professor for Critique Sessions.

Professional Experience before joining CWU faculty

2007: Video Screenings, One video of Mrs. Zhou Gui Zhen who has just been given the honor of being a National Living Treasure in China and another video on Mr. Zhu Jiang Long. Video screening will take place at the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts in March of 2007 in Louisville KY.

2006: “20th Anniversary Invited Artist, Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle Maine

2003:   “Artists Invite Artists”; Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle, Maine

1996-1999:  Resident Artist in Ceramics; Tennessee Technological University,
Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1994 - 1996:  Resident Artist in Ceramics; Archie Bray Foundation; Helena, Montana

1994-1995:  Studio Technician; Archie bray Foundation; Helena, Montana
   
1991-1994:  Teaching Assistant and Kiln Technician; University of Iowa, Iowa City

1993:  Studio Assistant; Ceramics; Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; Deer Isle, Maine

1992:  Studio Assistant; Ceramics; Penland School of Crafts; Penland, North Carolina

1991-1992:  Studio Assistant; Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts; Gatlinburg, Tennessee

Workshops and Lectures Conducted


                  Sept. 2010: Lecture on Professional Development, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana
                 
                  Aug. 2010: Workshop and Slide Lecture, Gallery One Ceramics Studio, Ellensburg Washington

Workshops and Lectures Conducted before joining CWU faculty


2008: Big Screen, A Virtual Workshop, 42nd National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2008: Creating an Image Database, UNC Teaching and Learning with Technologies Conference, Raleigh, North Carolina

                  2008: Lecture and Workshop, Collin College, Plano, Texas

                  2007: Lecture and Workshop, San Jose State University, San Jose, California

2007: Lecture and Workshop, El Diablo Valley College, Pleasant Hill, California

2007: “Yixing Clay and Tea Traditions”, 41st National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts Conference, Louisville, Kentucky

2007: Podcasting in Teaching, Digital Soup and Sandwich Lecture Series, University of North Carolina, Pembroke

2006: Lecture on my work and teaching philosophy, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China

2006: Lecture on my work and contemporary American ceramics, Nanjing Art Institute, Nanjing, China

2006: “Addiction to Flash and Ash”, 20+1 Woodfire Conference, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona

2006: Ceramics, Spring Hill Middle School, Wagram, North Carolina 

2005: “Clay is Under You”, Jack Britt High School, Fayetteville, North Carolina

2005: “Handbuilt, Thrown, Soda, Wood and Sigillata”, Sawtooth Art Center, Winston Salem, North Carolina

2004: “Soda Firing”, one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

2004: “Boxes Flasks and Teapots”, one-week workshop, Greenville Museum, Greenville, South Carolina

2003:  “Surface Work”, Vermont State Craft Center, Frog Hollow Craft School, Manchester, Vermont

2003:  Ceramics Workshop, VSA Spring Arts Festival, Charlevoix and Emmet County Schools, NCMC, Petoskey, Michigan

2003:  Arts in the Schools, Lincoln Elementary, Petoskey, Michigan

2002:  Three day work shop, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

2002: “ Diatoms and Virus Form Influence”; Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan

2002:  Hi Fire Sigillata, two-day workshop, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, Texas

2002:  Hi Fire Sigillata, two-day workshop, Utah State University, Logan, Utah

2002:  Hi Fire Sigillata, two-day workshop, Atlantic Beach Pottery, Jacksonville, Florida

2001:  Sit and Spin, Stand and Turn; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

1999:  Traditional and Non-traditional Tile Setting, two-day workshop, Furniture Society Conference, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

1999: "The Contemporary and Historical Use of Ceramics in Architecture and Furniture", Furniture Society Conference, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

1999:  Utilitarian Pots, four-day workshop, Austin Peay University, Clarkesville, Tennessee

1999:  Slips, Surface, Slabs, and Turning; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts, Smithville, Tennessee

1996 - 1999:  Sixth Grade Clay Workshops; Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1998:  Slips, Surface, Slabs, and Turning; two-day workshop, University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin

1998:  “Curatorial Education”, lecture, University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin

1998:  Thrown and Hand built Forms; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1997:  Tea Pots; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1997:  Soda Firing; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University; Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1997:  Winter Wood-Firing; Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1997:  Exploring the Teapot; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1996:   Raku Workshop; one-week workshop, Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee

1996:  Week of Mud; one-week workshop, University of Wisconsin; Whitewater, Wisconsin

1995:  “Soda Firing”; Archie Bray Foundation; Helena, Montana        

1994:  Slide Lecture; Holter Museum; Helena, Montana

1993: Summer Ceramics Workshop for High School Students; Four-week workshop, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 
Curatorial Experience

March 2012 “Atmospheric”, Sarah Spurgeon Gallery, Art Department, Central Washington University

 Feb.  2010  “Ceramic Abstractions, Formalist Approaches to the Media”, AD Gallery, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

Curatorial Experience before joining CWU faculty

2007

“Pitcher This, 40 Potters from California to Maine”, AD Gallery, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

“East Meets West, 29 Artists From Nanjing Normal University”, AD Gallery, UNC, Pembroke, North Carolina

1998
"Put a Lid on It, A Show About Containment" (traveling show)
Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee
Belmont University; Leu Art Gallery; Nashville, Tennessee
University of Wisconsin, Green Bay; Lawton Gallery; Green Bay, Wisconsin
University of Wisconsin, Whitewater; Crossman Gallery; Whitewater, Wisconsin
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Belmont University; Leu Art Gallery; Nashville, Tennessee
1997
"Anything That Pours" Tennessee Technological University, Appalachian Center for Crafts; Smithville, Tennessee
 
 
Feature Articles, Reviews and Publications

2006
 “500 Pitchers”, Terry Guess, Lark Books

2005
“500 Cups”, Suzanne Tourtillott, Lark Books
 
“500 Brooches”, Marthe Le Van, Lark Books

2004
“Soda / Salt National 2004”, Ceramics Monthly, September

2002
“500 Teapots”, by Kathy Triplett, Lark Books




2001
“Ceramics 2001”, Ceramics Monthly, September, review, photos, pp. 68-69

1999
“Robison and Guss”, by Ward Doubet, Clay Times, Cover Article July/August Issue, photos, pp. 10-13

               1998
"A Partnership in Clay", by Clive Clintonson, Ceramics Monthly, September, feature article, photos, pp. 64-67

1996
"Steeped in Clay", Ceramics Monthly, March, review, photos, pp. 46

Authored Publications

2009




Authored Publications before joining CWU faculty

2007

“Yixing Teapot Techniques”, Video Screening at NCECA conference, Louisville, Kentucky

2005

 “Collection Obsession”, Ceramics Art and Perception, March 2005 Issue #59

2001

“Bede Clarke’s Investment in Teaching and Art”, Ceramics Art and Perception, Issue #43

1999

“Hoggama Experience, The Building and Firing of a Well Designed Wood kiln”, Ceramics Technical, photos, Issue 8

1998

"Put a Lid On It", Ceramics Monthly, photos, November, pp. 44-45

"Anything That Pours", Ceramics Monthly, photos, January, pp. 48-50



























Service to CWU

University

2009-Present

Faculty Senate

2010-Present

C Farrell Scholarship Committee

Departmental

2011-2012

Chair of Art History Search Committee

VASE Committee, (Visiting Artist, Speakers and Exhibitions)

Department Curriculum Committee

Assessment Subcommittee

Advisor to the Clay Club

Advisor to SAC (Student Art Collective)

2010-2011

Department Curriculum Committee

Assessment Subcommittee

Advisor to the Clay Club

Advisor to SAC (Student Art Collective)


2009-2010

Website Committee

Department Curriculum Committee

Advisor to the Clay Club